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Voices In My Head

posted by: July 16, 2013 - 7:55am

Cameron and the GirlsWhat is normal? Normal often defies definition, especially for teenagers. Dealing with physical and emotional changes on a daily basis is tiring, so throwing a mental illness into the mix creates a recipe for disaster. Cameron and the Girls by Edward Averett is a fictional first-hand account of a boy dealing with schizophrenia and junior high, and not having much success with either.


Cameron’s medication quiets the voices in his head, but it also makes him feel sluggish and not present in his life. He experiments by taking himself off his meds, questioning the advice of both his doctor and his parents. He feels strong enough to handle the voices on his own, and for a time he feels better, especially when a new voice emerges. "The Girl" is sweet, kind, pretty, and wants to be his girlfriend. So what if she isn’t quite real? If he can just act "normal" enough to avoid suspicion, then they can be happy. Unfortunately, an actual girl has taken notice of Cameron and threatens his self-created utopia.


Averett, a clinical psychologist, has created an eye-opening look into the mind of a mentally ill teen. The "voices" are all written in different fonts, and they are all truly unique from each other and from Cameron. Unusual in teen literature, Cameron’s family are included as loving, supportive, and concerned for his safety and happiness. The junior high setting adds a level of discomfort to the experience, taking the reader back to their own adolescence and how out of place you can feel in your own mind and body. While not completely "normal", Cameron’s struggle for control, of his health, mind, and life, is a brave one, and readers will root for him to find balance and happiness.



Revised: July 17, 2013