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Girls Gone Bad

posted by: August 30, 2013 - 7:00am

The Wicked Girls cover artThe murder of a child is always shocking, and child killers even more so. In The Wicked Girls, Alex Marwood debuts with a gritty, psychological crime story about two British women trying to outrun their past. For Kirsty Lindsay and Amber Gordon, two girls from the same neighborhood but different worlds, their lives changed permanently one fateful afternoon when they were 11 and committed a horrendous crime against a child. After serving their time, they were given new identities and a chance to forge a new life. Amber, who drew a rougher lot as far as juvenile detention facilities go, eventually becomes a cleaning supervisor at a faded beach town amusement park. Kirsty is a successful journalist with a comfortable home and family, although recently the recession has put a strain on her career and finances. When a string of murders suddenly happens in the town where Amber lives, the two women are unexpectedly brought face-to-face, their shared past threatening to overwhelm them in new ways.

Marwood has constructed a gripping plot with shifting characters and twists like the maze of fun house mirrors in Amber’s amusement park. The backgrounds and dark secrets of the characters are balanced with the crime itself, making this a good choice for readers who like well-developed characters and relationships as well as crime drama. Ambiguous and not at all reassuring, this novel examines social structures and the criminal justice system and questions whether someone should be forever indebted to society for a past mistake. Until the last pages, readers are left wondering if the girls’ crime was accidental or the work of cold-blooded killers. Fans of Rosamund Lupton or Gillian Flynn will appreciate this murky, suspenseful story of flawed characters desperately grasping for normalcy.


Revised: September 9, 2013