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The Fascination Continues

posted by: February 8, 2013 - 7:01am

The Missing Manuscript of Jane AustenJane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice remains one of the most popular and imitated classics although it has been two hundred years since its publication on January 29, 2013. Syrie James offers an intriguing addition to the many modern Jane Austen homages with The Missing Manuscript of Jane Austen, which presents a story-within-a-story, both of which will delight ardent fans. 


Librarian Samantha McDonough is travelling in Oxford when she stumbles across a letter in an old book of poetry. The letter is from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra, and describes a manuscript Jane had lost while visiting an estate named Greenbriar in 1802. A missing Jane manuscript could be monumental and Samantha immediately begins researching. Her investigation leads her to the now-crumbling Greenbriar and its owner Anthony Whittaker. The two discover the pages in a secret compartment and begin reading The Stanhopes along with the reader. This purported Austen story introduces Rebecca Stanhope and her rector father, both snubbed by polite society because of a fabricated gambling charge. As Rebecca attempts to restore her father’s good name and discover the nefarious person spreading the lies, she encounters love. James does an excellent job of recreating Austen’s voice and setting and weaving two compelling stories. As the Stanhopes strive to regain their respectable position, Samantha and Anthony are caught up in their growing attraction, yet disagree on how to handle this invaluable treasure.


If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Jane should be pleased as punch, although it is doubtful that she would ever surrender to such vanity. Syrie James is one of a multitude of authors, including P.D. James and Colleen McCullough, who have entries in the Jane Austen assembly. From spunky Bridget Jones to Colin Firth’s (as Mr. Darcy) unforgettable lake scene, Pride and Prejudice remains a touchstone for modern storytelling.   



Revised: February 8, 2013