Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Every hero has a story. Summer Reading Club, June 15 through August 9. Sign up today.
The Hereford Branch is temporarily closed due to water damage. More information...
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

Murderous Manuscript

Murderous Manuscript

posted by:
April 8, 2015 - 7:00am

A Murder of MagpiesAuthor, journalist and former editor Judith Flanders has recently released A Murder of Magpies. This cozy London-based mystery has Flanders trading her more typical nonfiction writing for a witty whodunit novel.

 

Sam, an editor for a publishing house, finds that her pleasantly humdrum lifestyle has been turned upside down when her favorite gossip writer brings her a salacious manuscript. The book cites the illicit behaviors of the rich and famous. Shortly after receiving a copy, Sam’s life takes an unexpected turn for the worse.

 

When a bike courier is run down while carrying a copy of the manuscript, Jake, a handsome detective, seeks out Sam to see how the two are connected. After someone close to Sam goes missing, she puts on her sleuthing hat and works with Jake to find the culprit. Between the heat of adrenalin and the time together spent digging for clues, a romance ignites between Jake and Sam. Will Sam save her friend and get her banal life back?

 

A Murder of Magpies captures an even mix of effortless wit and downright detective spirit that will have you trying to figure out the mystery — if you pay enough attention, you just might. The novel is a colorful mashup of Bridget Jones and Sherlock Holmes.

Randalee

 
 

Irish Piracy

Irish Piracy

posted by:
April 7, 2015 - 7:00am

1636: Commander Cantrell in the West IndiesThe United States of Europe needs oil, so it’s off to the New World for Eddie Cantrell, his wife Anne Catherine, a company of Irish mercenaries and the local Dutch fleet. Welcome to the Ring of Fire Universe, where a small West Virginian town was dropped into the middle of the Germanies in the Thirty Years’ War, founding the United States over a hundred years early. It is a massive shared universe in 1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies by Eric Flint and Chuck Gannon.

 

When Eric Flint wrote 1632, it was a simple lark — throwing modern machinery and freedom of religion in Europe, hitting blend and seeing what amusing anachronisms popped out. The universe runs off of three main rules.  First, modern technology runs into Arthur C. Clarke’s Superiority paradox. It may be superior, but if it can’t be repaired or replaced easily, it’s no good in the long term. Second, history books have given all the major players an idea of who’s going to matter over the next few decades, and they can alter their plans accordingly. Third, small people can change the course of empires too, especially as Europe struggles with the ideas of democracy and freedom of religion. To add the kind of depth this premise is capable of, Flint threw open the doors, allowing other authors to first write short stories and collaborative novels. The universe got even bigger, and now there are over 20 novels focused on a wide variety of plot threads, and anthologies of meticulously researched fan stories. Quite a few authors got their starts writing for the Ring of Fire universe. It is living history.

 

1636 takes place around the Tar Lake of Trinidad, one of the more easily accessible oil fields of the world. Real politik leads the Wild Geese of Ireland, late of Spain, to found a new Irish Kingdom. Expect lengthy explanations of technology and politics, often more than plot or forward momentum. But that’s a big part of the reason the universe exists: to watch things being built in different directions.

Matt

 
 

No Strings Attached

No Strings Attached

posted by:
April 6, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Love by the BookFollow a year in the life of Lauren Cunningham, a single 28-year-old looking for change, in Love by the Book by Melissa Pimentel. She moves from Maine to London, leaving a serious relationship behind, and embarks on an active social life consisting of casually dating a multitude of sexy Brits.

 

Despite her declarations of liberation and wish for sexual adventures, her partners are disbelieving and disappear even as Lauren insists she is not interested in a serious relationship. Lauren decides to approach the problem analytically and resolves to follow a different dating guide each month of the year to learn the spicy secrets behind becoming a successful siren. Once those lessons are learned, she knows she will be more appealing to those men looking for plenty of sex without any relationship drama. From modern manuals such as The Rules to the Victorian-era Manners for Women, and even a handbook intended for guys, Lauren applies the tenets of each guide to her potential paramours such as “Top Hat” and “Sleepy Eyes” and journals the outcomes. The comic results are entertaining as Lauren documents some colossal failures, surprising successes and insightful life lessons from each experiment.  

 

Pimentel’s debut is a humorous look at a fresh and likeable young woman longing to embrace independence and sexual freedom. Humorous and realistic, this frothy fun will appeal to fans of Bridget Jones and HBO’s Girls.

Maureen

 
 

Sins of Our Fathers

Sins of Our Fathers

posted by:
April 3, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for A Reunion of GhostsFor Lady, Vee and Delph Alter, suicide runs in the family. Now, the clock is ticking for the three sisters in Judith Claire Mitchell's dynamic turn-of-the-century family saga A Reunion of Ghosts. The Alter siblings believe their fates are sealed and have selected midnight, December 31, 1999 as the date they, too, will end their lives. But first, they want to chronicle the story of four generations of Alters in a sort of tell-all group memoir that is also their suicide note.  

 

The Alter sisters come from a long, complicated line of suicidal tendencies going back to their great-grandmother, Iris. Iris was married to Lenz Alter, a Jewish Nobel prize-winning chemist who ironically developed the poison gas used by the Germans in World War II. Eventually, the scientist, their son Richard and his children (including the sisters' mother), also killed themselves. (Readers will find it helpful to refer to the detailed family tree included in the front of the book to keep track of who's who.)

 

Now, the Alter siblings are stuck. "The truth is, we all fell through the cracks, and that's where we've stayed," they said. They even live in the same inherited Upper West Side apartment, complete with a "death and dying room" no one has slept in for years. Lady, divorced and miserable, has already attempted suicide once. Vee, whose husband died, is facing a cancer recurrence. The youngest Delph contemplates what being cursed really means. They want to hasten what they feel is the inevitable course of events.

 

Mitchell has crafted here a stylistically complex, intertwining narrative through the unified voice of the three protagonists. It is their pragmatism and wry, dark humor that lend this family portrait its memorable quality. While Ghosts is about an imaginary family, Mitchell does use some historical material. The German-Jewish scientist Fritz Haber and his first wife, Clara, were the inspiration for Lenz and Iris Alter. Readers interested in Mitchell's research will find a thorough bibliography at the end of this achingly elegant story.

Cynthia

 
 

Mirror, Mirror

Mirror, Mirror

posted by:
April 2, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for FairestMarissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles series continues with Fairest, the backstory of Queen Levana, the evil Lunar queen who has been trying to kill main character Cinder since book one. An in-between, shorter novel, leading up to Winter, which is set to be released in November, Fairest gives readers background knowledge on the villain we love to hate.

 

Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles is a futuristic series of fairy tale retellings filled with cyborgs, genetically engineered diseases and a civilization living on the moon. In each novel, Meyer bases her futuristic science fiction story on a well-known fairy tale, from Cinderella to Little Red Riding Hood to Rapunzel. Fairest is set years before the series begins. Levana, the Lunar queen has been a source of mystery since the first book, but now, Meyer provides an explanation, but not support for Levana’s actions throughout the rest of the series. Her story begins when Levana is but a princess whose parents have just died and follows her through her sister’s time as queen of Luna. Readers learn more about her romantic history and her relationship with the people of Luna. Longtime readers are also treated to appearances from characters they’ve come to know well, like Cinder and Winter.

 

The Lunar Chronicles is a fabulous series for anyone who loves fairy tale retellings. Meyer’s futuristic reimagining of classic stories is inventive and the stories themselves keep readers on the edge of their seats. Now is the perfect time to get caught up on all your favorite fairy tale characters, and Fairest allows readers a way to better understand one of the series' most evil characters.

Laura

 
 

Monster Mash

Monster Mash

posted by:
April 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Monster Hunter: NemesisAgent Franks has been a part of the Monster Hunter series by Larry Correia since the beginning. When Owen Pitt killed his first werewolf, Agent Franks was the bad cop sent in to try and make him play nice. When the things that go bump in the night try to bump the United States, Agent Franks is the bloodiest line of defense. When demons need punching, when eldritch horrors try to sneak into our reality, Agent Franks lays down the firepower. He’s the sort of character who gets respect, not out of any charisma, but because he’s the hardest man in the fight. Monster Hunter: Nemesis is Franks’ time in the spotlight.

 

Larry Correia’s Monster Hunter has always been a series about taking down horrors through superior firepower. It’s a red-blooded fantasy where the guns are described in loving detail, the gore splatters all over the page and combat is frequently about punching until there’s only one thing left standing. Franks has always been one of the most interesting parts of that, a die-hard take on Frankenstein’s monster, but he’s spent most of his time in the series as a spectacularly awesome roadblock and sometimes ally.

 

There has always been one line that couldn’t be crossed with Franks. Actually, there have been a lot of lines, because he’s pretty unpleasant to everyone around him, but only one hard line that allows Franks to go rogue. No others like Franks are allowed to be created. Naturally, that is also a line that is charged over with abandon. So what does a six-foot-something, 300-pound wall of muscle and regeneration do when faced with a frame job and betrayal? If your hope was blow it up and punch it out, not necessarily in that order, you’re in for a treat.

 

Matt

categories:

 
 

All Trains Lead to Infidelity

All Trains Lead to Infidelity

posted by:
March 31, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Hausfrau There may be 50 ways to leave your lover, but for Anna Benz there is only one way to meet your lover…and that's by train. Jill Alexander Essbaum’s debut novel, Hausfrau, watches Anna’s downward spiral as she grasps at physical intimacies in an attempt to fill the gaping emotional void of her life.  

 

Anna, an American living in a hamlet in Switzerland, is profoundly unhappy. She finds the Swiss — including her banker husband Bruno — remote, and her few friendships with expats are unfulfilling. Her struggles with the local Schwiizerdütsch dialect increase her feelings of alienation, even from her three children. The train leaving the village beckons Anna with an escape. She enrolls in a German class, but quickly finds herself in an extramarital affair with a classmate. Soon after, she drifts into another sexual relationship with a family friend.

 

Essbaum writes Anna as a passive woman with little will, or does she? Anna enters into liaisons readily, yet resists female friendship. Frustrated with her sadness, her husband suggests psychotherapy. As her Jungian analyst probes Anna’s psyche and interprets her dreams and her language teacher parses grammar, Anna holds back, refusing to fully participate in the very activities she’s chosen to allay her distress. Essbaum’s use of language is precise as she slowly reveals Anna’s story by cycling between past and present, illuminating the nature of her discontent as her decisions become increasingly reckless and self-destructive. Doktor Messerli tells Anna in a therapy session, “…there’s no need to seek out those mistakes. For now it is they who seek you.” Intense and disconcerting, Hausfrau is an unforgettable portrait of a desperate woman.

Lori

categories:

 
 

Thinking Out Loud

The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion by Meghan DaumMeghan Daum's new essay collection The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion starts off with an emotional stab. In her opening essay, Daum speaks about her complicated relationship with her mother and her ho-hum reaction to her death. "I was as relieved as I planned to be," she says, when her mother finally stops breathing. It’s this honesty that you should expect from Daum as she explores a hodgepodge of subjects from her flawed family to her obsession with Joni Mitchell. The L.A. Times columnist and author of three previous books, ruminates on what makes her tick, even when it is far from flattering.

 

Daum isn't afraid to say what many might feel but would never utter aloud. Her 10 essays range from light and insignificant to a catharsis for the 40-something as she traverses life's weightier decisions. She's at her best early on with her character-driven portrait of her mother whose behavior her daughter could not abide.

 

Intelligent and candid, Daum exudes an unapologetic tone as she grapples with creeping midlife and what to make of it. There are moments of eloquent internal clarity that reach across the page. Her thought-provoking essay "Difference Maker," about her experience mentoring in the Big Brothers, Big Sisters program, delves into the underbelly of foster care. It's an observant gem that does not pretend to have the answers. That's what rises to the top of Daum’s latest effort. For all the self-analysis and "unspeakable thoughts many of us harbor," life is still often about the intangibles.

Cynthia

 
 

Lies of Midwives

Lies of Midwives

posted by:
March 27, 2015 - 7:00am

The Secrets of Midwives by Sally HepworthSally Hepworth’s new novel The Secrets of Midwives is realistic fiction set in present day Rhode Island with periodic glimpses of 1950s rural England. This novel is a heartfelt look at the relationships of mothers and daughters while at the same time giving a general glimpse at the profession of midwifery. While not Sally Hepworth’s debut novel, it is her first to be published in the U.S.

 

This charming novel looks at three generations of women who have all chosen to pursue the career of midwife, each pursuing the profession in a different way. Floss, the matriarch of the family, is a bit late in years to practice so she has taken to teaching. Gloss, her daughter, prefers to provide midwife services for home births while Gloss’s daughter Neva practices at a birthing center housed in a hospital.

 

Midwifery isn’t the only thing these women share. All three carry the heavy weight of a life altering-secret. When Neva learns she is pregnant, she pretends that there is no father. Her mother Grace is challenged by the board of nursing and her mystery could cost her license. Then there is Floss, who carries the heaviest burden of them all…because what she is hiding affects them all.

 

Hepworth skillfully uncovers each woman’s secret little by little, culminating in an emotional final few chapters. If the novel leaves you longing for something similar, Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah is another read about uncovering secrets and the relationships of mother and daughter.

Randalee

categories:

 
 

Short Stories Sweet and Tart

Short Stories Sweet and Tart

posted by:
March 26, 2015 - 7:00am

This House Is Not for Sale by E. C. OsonduStone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret AtwoodShort stories are usually read in a single sitting. Pick up either of these new collections, This House Is Not for Sale by E. C. Osondu or Stone Mattress: Nine Tales by Margaret Atwood, and find that sitting stretching out as one story leads to the next.

 

This House Is Not for Sale is set in a nameless African village. The main character of each story lives in Grandpa’s grand family house and so falls under his powerful, and perhaps corrupt, domain. Some of the stories feature ordinary problems, like Abule and his serially cheating wife or Uncle Currency’s workplace embezzlement. Other problems are more closely tied to African folklore, such as the soul-stealer who prevents Tata from carrying pregnancies to term. Conflicts are illuminated by anonymous villagers’ gossipy commentary reminiscent of a fragmented Greek chorus, and when necessary, the godfather-like Grandpa steps in to deliver a final judgment. Esondu, winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, captures both the joy and pain of everyday life in these thoughtful vignettes.

 

Bitingly irreverent wit, an unsentimental use of aging protagonists and unpredictable plots mark the wonderful Stone Mattress. The first three stories form a sort of trilogy. In “Alphinland,” widowed Constance, author of a cult classic fantasy series, is guided through a blizzard by the blow-by-blow verbal instructions issued by her dead husband. At the same time, she is also remembering her first love, the pompous and ever-randy poet Gavin, who betrayed Constance with another woman. “Revenent” features Gavin, now an impotent curmudgeon married to his third, much younger wife who is heavily invested in preserving Gavin’s legacy, if not necessarily Gavin himself. Finally, in “Dark Lady,” all the players — including the “other woman” — meet again. Other stories revisit the friends from “The Robber Bride,” find a predatory widow meeting up with her rapist prom date of 50 years ago or track a one-trick pony author determined to snuff out old friends living off his royalties. Atwood is a master wordsmith and excels when revealing her characters’ internal dialogue. The only disappointment here is that by their nature, these stories are short so the pleasure of reading them ends too quickly.

Lori

categories: