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Genrenauts

posted by: June 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Shootout SolutionHave you ever wanted to be in your favorite book? Make sure the bad guys lose? Maybe change the entire course of the story? Of course you have; you’re reading this blog. In Michael R. Underwood’s Genrenauts: The Shootout Solution, Leah Tang can be your stand-in. Leah is a stand-up comedian trying to make a name for herself in Baltimore and enduring all the frustrating nonsense that being an Asian female comic in a dive bar can provide: drunken hecklers, rude come-ons, people who completely misunderstand a really good joke. But Leah presses on, despite the bar owner’s lack of support for anyone other than drunken louts. By the end of her set, she has attracted attention of both the wanted and unwanted kinds.

 

The wanted kind: He was the only one who got her jokes. Why not go along for the ride? Being a smart person, Leah texts her friend to let her know she is heading down I-97 with a strange man who had promised her a job.

 

At the Genrenauts Foundation building, however, Leah begins to rethink her life choices. What’s with 19th century period attire? Why is a woman being wheeled down the hall in a gurney? What’s with the thing that looks suspiciously like a spaceship? Leah almost walks away. When they step off the spaceship into the wild, wild West, she wishes she had run when she had the chance. How can she help save the so-called real world if she cannot figure out the tropes and devices of even one Genre World?

 

If you like the TV show Leverage or the books of Jasper Fforde, Genrenauts is absolutely the series for you. Exploring genre tropes while saving the world has never been more fun. And be sure to check out the second in the series, Genrenauts: The Absconded Ambassador!


 
 

Injection

posted by: June 21, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for InjectionFive eccentric geniuses, the Cultural Cross-Contamination Unit, are gathered and given free rein to improve the world as they see fit. Years after the five initiate their mysterious means to “make the 21st century more interesting,” they begin to see the bizarre and occasionally horrifying repercussions of their inexplicable experiment. Injection by Warren Ellis is a truly unique experience; it dips its toes in science fiction, horror, action and even a little bit of traditional folklore, and meanders nonlinearly through different characters’ stories, leaving it up to the reader to decrypt the tale of “the Injection.”

 

Long after the Cultural Cross-Contamination Unit have parted ways, they each begin coming into contact with the twisted fruit of their earlier labor. What began as a seemingly innocent computer program eventually leads to a number of horrifying scenes, including a computer speaking through a mutilated human host and an ancient legend about monstrous pixies being made real by a malicious artificial intelligence. These surreal scenes and the more grounded everyday lives of the characters, including a surprising number of sandwiches illustrated and mentioned throughout the course of the book, are rendered masterfully by artist Declan Shalvey and colorist Jordie Bellaire, whose styles mesh wonderfully to highlight the rapidly shifting tone of the book.

 

Fans of Warren Ellis will recognize his signature combination of science and magic at work here. The two are closely linked in this story, and Ellis takes his time exploring the similarities as he slowly unravels the truth behind the mysterious “injection.” Something like a particularly dreamlike episode of the X-Files, Injection is a wild ride that explores the ways that people interact with technology and the shocking ways that technology could start to react. If you enjoy Injection, try Moon Knight: From the Dead by the same creative team.

 


 
 

Jane Steele

posted by: June 20, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Jane SteeleJane Eyre is not the most charming of classic literary heroines. Readers who love her are die-hard fans, and readers who don’t are baffled that she has fans at all. Lindsay Faye’s new book Jane Steele breathes fresh life into this complex classic character. While Faye’s heroine loves Bronte’s classic novel, and even faces some similar experiences as the original Jane, her response to these circumstances makes her a heroine modern readers will swoon for, regardless of how they feel about her namesake. While Faye may borrow a few plot points from Bronte, this is not a retelling of Jane Eyre.

 

Jane Steele is orphaned and left in the care of an aunt who seems to despise her. Jane is sent to a horrendous boarding school where girls are starved and humiliated. While Eyre accepted these trials as part of her lot, Steele takes matters into her own hands. She begins her story by telling us, “Of all my many murders, committed for love and for better reasons, the first was the most important." This Jane is a kind of vigilante, righting the wrongs of society.

 

After abruptly leaving Lowan Bridge School, then surviving and even thriving on some of London’s less savory streets, she finds a governess position at a large estate owned by Mr. Charles Thornfield. At Highgate House, she finds an intriguing cast of characters. Thornfield, recently returned to England after years serving in the Punjab, seems to be harboring secrets. His entire household, including his charming young ward, are all Sikhs, and in this exotic and strange new household Jane feels more at home than she ever has before.

 

This newfound happiness is jeopardized when she finds herself falling in love with her employer, even as she tries to hide her own unsavory past. And, can she say for certain she will never murder again?

 

This homicidal heroine, and her confessional style narrative will captivate readers. Fans should also check out The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell, Tracy Chevalier’s Reader, I Married Him: Stories Inspired by Jane Eyre and Nelly Dean: A Return to Wuthering Heights by Alison Case.

 


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The View from the Cheap Seats

posted by: June 17, 2016 - 6:00am

Cover art for View from the Cheap SeatsWhile author Neil Gaiman might be best known as a fantasy novelist, he’s better described as a kind of writer-of-all-trades. His acclaimed Sandman series was one of the first graphic novels to make the New York Times best-seller list and he has published numerous children’s works to critical accolades. He’s a master of the short story. But his latest published work, The View from the Cheap Seats, is a collection of the prolific, versatile writer’s nonfiction pieces.

 

Gaiman is an unabashedly public figure who remains accessible to his many fans through his online journal and presence on social media. And while his built-in audience will be clamoring for this volume, it has much to recommend for those who have never read his nonfiction. The View features five dozen articles, speeches, introductions and essays on topics that are interesting and in some way important to the author.

 

He admits on his online journal: “It's a relief that it's published: I don't think I've ever been as nervous about a book coming out as I have been about this one. You can hide behind fiction. You can't hide behind things that are about what you think and believe.”
These thoughtful, insightful pieces are gathered under 10 categorized chapters, including “Some People I Have Known,” “On Comics and the People Who Make Them,” and of course, “Some Things I Believe.” Included here is his acceptance speech from the 2009 Newbery Awards, where he won the highest prize in children’s literature for The Graveyard Book, his Sunday New York Times piece “On Stephen King,” his introduction to the reissue of the final book in Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series and the in-memoriam essay he wrote describing Lou Reed’s songs as the soundtrack to his life.

 

The View would make an excellent gift book, as it’s the kind of collection you can pick up whether you have 10 minutes to devote to reading or a whole hour. You can always count on him to entertain, but here he manages to be thought provoking and incisive as well. Gaiman is the erudite friend you’d want at your dinner party, always ready to start the conversation.

 

As a librarian, I must admit that my favorite piece in the collection is a lecture entitled “Why Our Future Depends on Libraries, Reading and Daydreaming.” You’d be hard-pressed to find a better advocate for public libraries than Neil Gaiman. This essay alone will inspire you to visit the library to find out for yourself just what keeps us relevant.


 
 

The Invisible Library

posted by: June 16, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Invisible LibraryWhen travelling between realities you may stumble upon The Invisible Library, the largest single collection of fiction books taken from all over the multiverse, and its librarians, professional spies who infiltrate alternate realities in search of rare books wanted for the library’s collection. Irene is one such librarian, whose most recent assignment is to steal a book of fairy tales from an alternative version of London.

 

But when she and her assistant Kai arrive, they soon discover that the book they are looking for has been stolen, and its owner murdered. They’ll have to race against a group of biotechnically-enhanced terrorists, a cat-suit-wearing burglar, a contingency of Fae and a murderous rogue librarian to find the book first if they want to succeed in their mission.

 

Genevieve Cogman blends real world elements with fantasy to create her London. The owner of the stolen book? Vampire. High society gentleman who knows more than he should? An agent of chaos. The plot is an interesting mix of murder mystery, suspenseful intrigue and steampunk fantasy. Everyone is hiding at least one secret, some more damaging than others. Not everyone acts in the most morally acceptable way; Irene in particular has a morally ambiguous world view because she won’t jeopardize the library’s mission — to preserve as many books as possible, no more and no less. And the best mystery is why the library even needs this particular copy of fairy tales. How much damage can one book do?

 

A Library Reads selection for June, The Invisible Library is the first in a series that has already been published in the UK. The Masked City (Book 2) and The Burning Page (Book 3) are slated for release in September and December 2016.  If you enjoy The Librarians TV show, Gail Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate series or the Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde, check out this series.

 


 
 

LaRose

posted by: June 15, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for LaRoseLouise Erdrich is the reigning queen of Native American fiction, author of award-winning books for adults and children which showcase her native heritage. Her newest novel, LaRose, reflects Anishinaabe traditions as she explores the rippling consequences of tragedy and how two families adapt in both traditional and modern ways.

 

Landreaux Iron is a good man. He’s a loving father, faithful husband and sensitive nurse to his home health care patients. Hunting at the edge of reservation land, he takes aim at a deer meant to feed his family and instead accidentally shoots his neighbor’s little boy, Dusty Ravich, who is also Landraux’s nephew. Dusty’s death devastates his own family with grief and the Iron family with guilt. Landraux then commits a second unthinkable act: seeking guidance from his Ojibwe customs, he and his wife Emmeline give their own little boy, LaRose, to the Ravich family as atonement.

 

Erdrich unfolds this story at a leisurely pace. The grief experienced by the Ravich and Iron clans cannot be neatly packaged, and Erdrich allows parents, siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins to wander down separate paths as each tries to accommodate this unique double loss. Woven into the scrim dividing this life and the afterlife are the mystical stories of LaRose’s ancestors and the societal ills, historic and current, which plague the indigenous North Americans.

 

Visit with Erdrich online at her blog at Birchbark Books site, which is also a purveyor of Native books, arts and jewelry. To enjoy more stories featuring contemporary Ojibwe culture, try the Cork O’Connor suspense series by William Kent Krueger.


 
 

Smarter Faster Better

posted by: June 14, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Smarter Faster BetterWhen it comes down to it, few people understand or even think about the difference between being productive and being busy. If we get as many tasks done in the day as we can, are we really being productive? Charles Duhigg explains why productivity and busyness are not synonymous in his newest book Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business. As the title suggests, we should be striving to be fully productive in our day-to-day tasks, rather than looking at them as a list of chores that need to be done as quickly as possible. True productivity fosters creativity, motivation and inspiration. It’s not just about completing tasks — it’s about fully doing tasks.

 

Duhigg shares his eight principles to true productivity: motivation, teams, focus, goal setting, managing others, decision making, innovation and absorbing data. Each principle has an anecdote about some sort of team, business or group that was on the brink of failure until they learned to fully harness their productivity. For example, under “teams,” by looking at the comedians on Saturday Night Live, Duhigg explains that the way team members interact with one another is far more important than who is actually on the team. Duhigg uses the term “psychological safety” to prove why that interaction is so important: When team members are unafraid to fail or be judged, they can be fully productive and share ideas without concern. Duhigg’s real-life examples make this non-fiction book a thought-provoking and narrative read. He favors drawings over diagrams and quotations over statistics, breaking down the psychological density of the topic so that readers can easily apply his productivity principles to their daily lives. Ultimately, this is a motivational and engaging read, perfect for anyone striving for self-improvement or fulfillment.


 
 

The Ballad of Black Tom

posted by: June 13, 2016 - 7:00am

The Ballad of Black TomWhat happens when author and former Washington Post Best Science Fiction & Fantasy winner Victor LaValle writes a story that combines horror, science fiction and mystery? The result is his latest novella The Ballad of Black Tom.

 

The Ballad of Black Tom takes place in 1920s New York. Readers quickly enter the world of Charles Thomas Tester, a 20-year-old African American hustler from Harlem. On the streets of New York, Charles goes by the name of Tommy, and Tommy likes to put on a show. He portrays himself as the “dazzling, down-and-out musician” by wearing a gray flannel suit, an aging seal-brown trooper hat and brown leather brogues with nicked toes and  completes the look by toting around a guitar case (once in a while there's an actual guitar inside). Although Tommy has no musical talent, it doesn’t stop his hustle. Yes, he'll play the role of a musician, hum a few sour notes and scam people all for the sake of supporting himself and his ailing father. Things take a turn for the worst when Tommy attracts the attention of a wealthy white man named Robert Suydam. A cop and private detective, who are watching Suydam, now have their eyes on Tommy, after witnessing their first encounter. Suydam offers Tommy a couple hundred bucks to play a few tunes at his upcoming party. Astonish that someone actually likes his non-vocal abilities, but not one to turn down money, Tommy accepts. Suydam introduces him to a realm of crime and magic that sets off a chain of dark events that will forever change Tommy's life. Suydam tells Tommy about awakening a Sleeping King that sleeps at the bottom of an ocean. Once this Sleeping King awakes, he’ll create a new world where a select few will be rewarded. Tommy is intrigued. When he immerses himself into this magical world, he becomes a different person, a monster, who no longer goes by the name of Tommy, but "Black Tom."

 

If you're looking for a quick entertaining read, I recommend The Ballad of Black Tom. This book is a page-turner and would make for a great film. If you’re interested in more books by Victor LaValle, check out Big Machine and The Devil in Silver.


 
 

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