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posted by: October 26, 2015 - 7:00am

Armada coverEver wished life was more like a video game, where you could save the world with your friends and triumph over evil alien invaders? Ever wanted to be the hero, making all the right choices and saving the day?


Ever thought that maybe, just maybe, there’s more to the story than the player gets to know?


Ernest Cline brings his pop culture-referencing, video game-playing and '80s nostalgia-inducing strengths to his second novel Armada. Following the success of his first novel Ready Player One, Cline’s newest hero is Zack Lightman, a senior in high school who holds the ranking of sixth best player in the video game Armada. Armada’s gameplay consists of defending the Earth from attacking alien forces; during missions players control drones instead of flying a manned flight suit. Outside of playing Armada, Zack has no direction in life and little interest in the outside world. He does enjoy listening to music and reading the journals his father left behind when he died. The journals detail his father’s conspiracy theory – all of the popular science fiction movies and video games over the past couple of decades are preparing humanity for an inevitable confrontation with an alien race. The video games in particular are being used to train gamers for future combat.


Zack thinks this all sounds rather far-fetched until the day he spots a spaceship hovering over his school. A spaceship that looks like one of the enemy alien ships in Armada. Suddenly everything Zack knew about reality has changed, and he’s whisked off to a secret government base to take part in defending Earth from the Europans, an alien species set on the destruction of humanity. And he’s thrilled, in a sense, because it’s exciting to be called upon to defend Earth. Except for the niggling voice in the back of Zack’s head that thinks the Europans are acting a little too much like a scripted video game villain. That maybe things aren’t as they seem, or as Zack’s commanding officers think they seem. But what can one video gamer do?


Armada blends the classic coming-of-age story with an alien invasion packed with action and thrills. While not as strong of a storyline as Ready Player One, Cline’s use of pop culture still provides plenty of chuckles. His action scenes make this a good book for any science fiction or video game fan.


My Cousin Momo and Nerdy Birdy

posted by: October 23, 2015 - 7:00am

My Cousin Momo cover.Nerdy Birdy coverMy Cousin Momo is Zachariah OHora’s latest lovable picture book about a flying squirrel named Momo who is visiting relatives. His cousins have been anxiously awaiting his arrival, but he isn’t quite what they expected. In fact, Momo is a little weird. He doesn’t fly, his favorite superhero is Muffin Man, and he doesn’t even know how to play the simplest games, like Acorn-Pong! However, he manages to show them that being weird is cool and doing things differently is actually pretty awesome. Kids will relate to this delightful, simple story which encourages readers of all ages to look at the world a little differently. The quirky, fun illustrations are a big bonus as well.


In Aaron Reynolds new picture book, Nerdy Birdy doesn’t feel like he fits in anywhere. With his giant glasses and odd allergies, he just isn’t cool enough to hang with Eagle, Robin and Cardinal. Just when he thinks he’s doomed to be friendless forever, he meets a group of birds just as nerdy as him. They even like to play World of Wormcraft! When a different kind of outsider wants to join their flock, Nerdy Birdy needs to persuade his new friends to accept misfits of all sorts. This is a great book about making friends and welcoming everyone. Reynolds manages to make this sometimes difficult topic truly giggle-worthy.




posted by: October 22, 2015 - 7:00am

George coverAs societal awareness of the transgender identity grows, the conversation on what it means to grow up transgender is also gaining new voices. First-time author Alex Gino’s book George puts readers inside the mind of a transgender child struggling to understand her gender identity and to convey that identity to those important to her.


George is a fourth-grader with a mother and older brother, a best friend and a secret – she’s a girl who wants to be called Melissa, not the boy named George that everyone thinks she is. It’s distressing for her to have to use the boy’s bathroom, to keep her hair cut short and to be called “young man.” George’s greatest fear is that her family won’t understand or accept her if she tells them the truth. She decides, instead, to hide her identity, causing her to continue to feel isolated and frustrated.


This changes the day her teacher holds auditions for the class play of Charlotte’s Web. George desperately wants to play Charlotte. Not only does she admire Charlotte’s strength, but also believes that if she can land this key role she can show everyone, especially her mom, the girl she is. However, her dream is dashed when her teacher won’t let her audition for the part; after all, Charlotte is a girl role and to her teacher George is a boy. When her best friend Kelly comes up with a plan for George to be able to perform as Charlotte, George has to gather her courage to show everyone who she is.


While the book is recommended for middle school readers, George is the story of a child discovering and accepting herself that everyone, child and adult, transgender and cisgender alike, can relate to. George’s quest to be accepted for who she is gives readers insight into her world in a way that is equally heartbreaking and heartwarming. Readers interested in children’s books with a transgender protagonist should also read Ami Polonsky’s Gracefully Grayson.


Big Magic

posted by: October 22, 2015 - 7:00am

Big Magic coverIf you’re an artist of any kind, if you aspire to live a life driven by curiosity, if you believe that inspiration and creativity are literal magic, then you will find a kindred spirit in Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear.


Gilbert is best known for her 2006 memoir Eat, Pray, Love about her life-changing travels to Italy, India and Indonesia. But Gilbert advises that it’s not necessary to pack up and travel the world for the sake of your art—you can and should make room for creativity and magic in your everyday life, and Big Magic provides the roadmap. She also warns against putting unnecessary pressure on your creativity or burdening it by asking it to financially support you. This advice could feel inauthentic coming from a writer who does support herself with her art, but Gilbert is so earnest in her beliefs, it’s impossible to begrudge her success.


Instead of advocating fearlessness, Gilbert says that we should allow plenty of room for our fear, but realize that it should not control our creative lives. She also dismisses the popular stereotype of the tormented artist. Instead, she suggests that your work should be a positive collaboration between you and your creativity. Gilbert theorizes that ideas are incorporeal entities longing to be brought into existence and that if we aren’t receptive to them, they will knock at the next artist’s door. She relates an anecdote about a novel she failed to write, only to discover years later that a very similar idea had magically found Ann Patchett.


After writing Big Magic, Gilbert didn’t feel like she was finished with the subject of creativity and began a podcast called Magic Lessons where she and guests, including Patchett and Cheryl Strayed counsel writers and artists who are having issues in their creative lives.


Beautifully written and full of fresh ideas on the nature of creativity, Big Magic is sure to become recommended reading along with classics like Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way and Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird.


Pretty Girls

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter coverDo bad things happen to pretty girls? Yes, they do according to Karin Slaughter’s latest novel, Pretty Girls. A gripping, fast-paced, intense thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat. From the first page she grabs you by the throat and does not let go until the very last word.


Pretty Girls begins with Claire Scott witnessing her husband Paul’s brutal murder. Paul was her provider, lover, soulmate and family for 20 years. She even disowned her sister, Lydia, when she accused him of attempted rape. She trusted Paul implicitly, while Lydia was a thieving alcoholic and drug addict. But how well did she really know him. Yes, he was by her side when her father committed suicide and endlessly filled the hole in her heart from her eldest sister’s disappearance. But now, 20 years later, another pretty girl has gone missing in their town and Paul has been murdered. Are these two events connected? Was Lydia telling the truth? As she moves forward from his death, Claire learns that Paul had secrets. But how deep are those secrets and how do they affect her and her sister Lydia? Who can she trust to help her find the truth? Masterfully told through both Claire and Lydia’s voices with excerpts from their father’s journal before his suicide, Slaughter weaves a tale of both deception and shock.


Filled with plenty of “aha!” moments only to be followed with “but what about…?” moments, Slaughter keeps you guessing to the very end. As you learn more about Paul Scott with each page, discovering the truth will become your mission as much as Claire’s. So much so that you may even suffer a sleepless night or two, but you will not regret it!


Looking for other twisting tales of deception like Pretty Girls? Try The Good Girl by Mary Kubica and Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll.



The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage coverAutomatons! Higher mathematics! World domination! The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage by Sydney Padua contains everything inquiring minds could ask for. A history of the nascent development of computing, it contains a detailed and thoroughly researched account of the collaboration between Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage in their creation of the Analytical Machine (now known as a computer). Not limited to just explanations of the mechanical and theoretic processes, Padua also delves into contextualizing the machine’s creation with profiles of the people, culture and time period that had an influence on its formation. Any dryness you might expect of such subject matter is diverted by speculation of what Sherlockian adventures could have happened if the groundbreaking machine actually managed to be produced in the Victorian era of its imagining.


Padua’s zeal for her subject is infectious and her research has yielded amusing vignettes of the characters who were involved in the creation of computation, including cameos by George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and Queen Victoria. Despite her frequent demurrals to expertise, she concisely breaks down the complex engineering of her subject (with diagrams!) so that it is understandable for those of us who aren’t engineers, mathematicians or wizards. Be warned: It is text heavy for a graphic novel, primarily because the number and density of footnotes rivals those of the late Terry Pratchett. Like The Great Pratchett, however, the footnotes contain amusing digressions whose levity make them worth the effort. 




Lair of Dreams

posted by: October 20, 2015 - 7:00am

Lair of Dreams by Libba BrayIt takes a certain kind of writing magic to transport readers so completely into the past, but that is exactly what Libba Bray does in Lair of Dreams, her latest installment of The Diviners series. With careful attention to detail she brings to life New York City during the Roaring 20s with all its slang, speakeasies and the social issues bubbling just beneath the glossy surface. From this setting Bray weaves a spine-tingling ghost story that will keep readers up late into the night.


The Diviners introduced us to Evie O'Neill, a young girl heading to New York City in search of parties and good times. Beneath her flapper façade she hides a special ability, and she soon finds herself drawn into a much stranger circle of friends chasing down a paranormal serial killer tormenting the city.


In this sequel, a strange “sleeping sickness” is striking citizens in Chinatown, killing more victims each night and reaching out into the city. This group of gifted teens must face the terrifying and unknown world of dreams to stop a new ghostly killer. This time, they are joined by Ling Chan, a dream walker who can communicate with the dead. Meanwhile, Sam, a fellow Diviner, and Evie have uncovered some strange clues about why they have these powers, and how much danger they may be in because of them.


This engrossing book has a little of everything including horror, humor and history in perfect measure. 




posted by: October 20, 2015 - 7:00am

ApocalyptiGirl coverAndrew MacLean, a rising powerhouse in the world of comics, gives a fresh, intimate take on the ever popular post-apocalyptic genre in ApocalyptiGirl: An Aria for the End Times. Written and illustrated by MacLean, ApocalyptiGirl is an in-depth character study of sorts, following Aria, a loner with a mysterious mission, and her cat, Jelly Beans, as they navigate the crumbling remains of civilizations past.


MacLean weaves fresh concepts together with some of the more familiar tropes of the post-apocalyptic genre. Sure, there are wandering bands of marauders and gunfights aplenty, but Aria isn’t your typical gruff drifter. She is an enthusiastic and often cheerful character with loads of pep and an unending well of affection set aside for her trusty feline sidekick. To categorize Aria only by her zest for life is to discredit the depth that MacLean has built into this character. Readers will follow her through scenes that range from serene to violent and heartbreaking to joyous, each revealing complex new facets of Aria’s personality.


You won’t find any barren badlands in this post-apocalyptic landscape. Aria’s world is one of cozy subway hideouts and sprawling ruins long reclaimed by nature, all vividly depicted in MacLean’s unmistakable style. Quiet moments of solitude and bloody action sequences alike are made equally impressive by the precise line work and expressive muted color palette.


ApocalyptiGirl is a masterfully crafted science fiction slice-of-life story that will have readers rooting for Aria from start to finish. For maximum post-apocalyptic fun, pair with Mad Max: Fury Road!



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