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Every Heart a Doorway

posted by: June 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Every Heart a DoorwayIf you were like me as a kid and read a lot of fantasy, you probably had no trouble believing that magic mirrors, wardrobes and tollbooths were everyday objects. That Narnia or Wonderland were one right-wrong turn away at any given moment. But the part of those stories I could never understand was the part where the kids go home at the end. If you really found a door to a world where magic was real why would you ever leave? Seanan McGuire’s Every Heart a Doorway asks a darker question: What would you do to get back?


Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children is a school for children coping with realness. Children who returned from magical worlds and desperately want to go back again. But their reasons for wanting to go back are more compelling than just wanting to fight dragons or whatever. These worlds offered them acceptance that they couldn’t find at home, a safe place to express their gender, sexuality, their personality. Plus dragons. Who wouldn’t want to go back?


But now someone’s threatening the safety of everyone on campus. Someone who would do anything to return to their world, and everyone’s a suspect.


With this book, McGuire has crafted not just one world but multiple worlds of compelling characters and situations, all nested inside one slim novella. Fans of the novel and TV series The Magicians will appreciate this clever deconstruction and homage to the fantasy genre.



Spring Cookbooks for Different Skill Levels

posted by: June 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Love and Lemons CookbookCover art for The Field to Table CookbookNow that it has finally warmed up, it’s time to get outdoors for a cookout or picnic and take advantage of the farmers markets! Here are some new cookbooks, on different levels of complexity, to inspire you and get you started.


Casual and home cooks will find serviceable recipes in The Love & Lemons Cookbook by Jeanine Donofrio. In this bright and engaging book, Donofrio takes a practical approach to food, contextualizing her meals by what is in season and readily available in the pantry. She is quick to provide advice for those nights when you don’t feel like laboring over a stove after work and includes suggestions for reenergizing leftovers. All of her recipes are vegetarian, and it is easy to pair them with a cut of meat or, in the opposite direction, adapt them to become vegan or gluten-free. If you have signed up for a CSA share this season, Love & Lemons can get you started figuring out what to do with the less common vegetables that might crop up in your share — like kohlrabi and parsnips. Many more recipes are also available on Donofrio’s award-winning blog.


Photo of blackberry empanadas

For gourmands looking for a challenge, there is The Field to Table Cookbook by Susan L Ebert, a manifesto that is the culmination of her previous work editing Rodale’s Organic Life (formerly Organic Gardening) and Texas Parks & Wildlife magazines. Ebert has shaped her life around a philosophy that puts the sustainability of her resources as the foremost consideration. She hunts, fishes, forages and farms for as much of her food as she can within the season and has closely researched where her food grows, including population statistics of the wildlife she shoots, chemical analyses of soil composition in her garden and snapshots on the history of American agricultural practices. It may take all day or longer to cook the meals precisely as Ebert does, but, through her writing, she demonstrates how sourcing your own food is not drudgery but an adventure. As much Jack London as Alice Waters, descriptions of tracking her quarry are laced with reminisces of stargazing and sunrises, meditations on the afternoons she spent as a child picking fruit and fishing trips spent with her own children. Those readers who might be squeamish or critical of Ebert’s hunting and fishing will be swayed by her reasoning and find a sympathetic pen from a woman not above crying for a goose she will later eat. It is worth noting that because Ebert’s lifestyle is so closely entwined with the environment and culture of her Texas home some of her meals, like Feral Hog Chile Verde, will be difficult to make here in Baltimore without relying on imports. Nevertheless, there is enough overlap between the Texas and Maryland climates to try out or adapt plenty of the recipes — homages to Chesapeake Bay seafood pop up surprisingly often!




Summer Book Buzz

posted by: June 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for GruntCover art for HomecomingLooking for the next buzzworthy title or the perfect beach read? BCPL librarians are sharing and discussing the must-have books for summer at Book Buzz sessions at various library branches. Join us and you’ll have an instant summer reading list!


We’re talking about so many great summer reads, but here’s a quick look at our favorites. Nonfiction readers should not miss Mary Roach’s newest, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, in which she applies her childlike sense of wonder and curiosity to war by asking all the questions that pop into her head when visiting military research facilities from Natick Soldier Systems Center to the nearby Aberdeen Proving Ground.


Fiction readers will devour these favorites which include Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing, a debut novel which Ta-Nehisi Coates called an “inspiration.” Told in 14 chapters spanning 250 years, each chapter tells the story of a descendant of two sisters from Ghana. Another debut getting considerable attention is Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley, a charming study of loneliness, the limits of one’s sanity and the powerful bond between a man and his dog.


In the mood for a thriller? Be sure to check out City of the Lost by Kelley Armstrong set in Rockton, a secret town in the far north of Canada where the hunted go to hide. Casey and her best friend each have reasons to disappear, but upon arriving in Rockton they realize they may be in even more danger. Wendy Walker’s All Is Not Forgotten follows teen Jenny Kramer’s brutal rape and the repercussions when her parents opt to try a new drug offered by doctors that will eradicate the memory of the rape.


My favorite is Leigh Himes’ The One That Got Away, which centers on Abbey Lahey, an overworked mom whose life is in a rut when she spies a former suitor, Alexander van Holt, in the pages of Town & Country. She immediately wonders “what if” and can’t stop thinking about how her life would have been different. When she wakes in the hospital from an accidental fall, she is Mrs. Alexander van Holt with money, privilege and status. But is it all she dreamed it would be? Be sure to join us to hear about more hot titles at a Book Buzz near you.


Help Us! Great Warrior

posted by: May 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Help Us! Great WarriorThe biggest hero of our time, the only creature that can rescue this dimension from an invasion of demons, the Greatest Warrior of our world…is a bean-shaped little scamp. More monster than human, more lazy than adventuring and more gluttonous than anything, the protagonist of Help Us! Great Warrior is not exactly the picture that comes to mind when imagining a legendary hero. She’s a three-foot-tall orb that wears boots and a bow on her head. She wields a sword and shield when she feels like it, but mostly because one’s shaped like a heart and the other has a cute bunny for a handle. When called upon to save the world by Hadiyah, the legendary guardian and keeper of the hero registry, her response is an awe inspiring, “Nah.” Only when her villagers are threatened — and with the encouragement of her best friend Leo — does she finally drag herself into battle.


Quirky is an understatement when it comes to the adorable, whimsical, bizarre story of Help Us! Great Warrior. It’s artistically bright and bouncy, with soft and appealing characters that make an instant and lasting impact as you enjoy each page. The humor hinges on the bizarre and unexpected, reminding readers not only visually but story-wise of other children’s epics like Adventure Time. Prepare to be enchanted by Great Warrior and her journey. She’s especially great for kids and especially inspiring for young girls, but a delight to all ages.


Dear Mr. You

posted by: May 26, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear Mr. YouWhen you think celebrity memoir, a series of letters dedicated to various men isn’t necessarily what comes to mind first. But Mary-Louise Parker’s Dear Mr. You is more than that. Using letter writing as a vehicle, Parker explores her relationships with the men she has met, may meet or never got a chance to meet, and by doing so revels in the way her relationships shape her life.


While her letters are candid, ranging from the erotic to the brutally honest, Parker doesn’t indulge in any kind of exposé or scandal; in fact she rarely names the addressees by their full names, so anyone looking for scandalous celebrity gossip may be a bit disappointed in that regard. Instead, what Parker creates is a poetic addition to the memoir genre. She tells her life story by reflecting on the lives and experiences of others, from the grandfather she never knew to a cab driver she would never meet again. While not all memories of the men who have come and gone from her life are pleasant, Parker embraces the good and the bad — the impersonal stranger, the demanding mentor, the intimate lover — and thanks each for the mark they have left on her life.


Lyrical and poignant, Dear Mr. You is many things in one slim volume. It’s a contemplation of the impact men have on their relationships, and a reminder that even trifling interactions between two people can leave a lasting impression. Ultimately, it is an epistolary reflection on how a life is shaped by people — living, dead or imagined. Reminiscent of Joan Didion’s works, Dear Mr. You is a celebration of a life through the lens of relationships from the trivial to the significant.



Miracleman: The Golden Age

posted by: May 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for MiraclemanAfter 30 years of legal troubles kept it from seeing print, Miracleman: The Golden Age by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham is a lost classic that is well worth the wait. For those unfamiliar, Miracleman was the first “serious” superhero, who began the “grim ‘n gritty” style of comics in the 1980’s.This was a time when writers started asking what would happen if superheroes existed in the real world. The answer was usually violent. But for a comic that came from the same era as cynical classics like Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, Neil Gaiman’s Miracleman is surprisingly optimistic.


The story of Miracleman is basically about a Superman knockoff who discovers that he’s actually the product of government experiments and brainwashing. He decides to break the cycle of superhero antics by abolishing all governments and setting up a global utopia over which he rules as a god. It’s a pretty shocking concept, but when Neil Gaiman took over writing the book he did something even more audacious: he took the idea of a world without crime and ran with it. Instead of focusing on Miracleman, the book suddenly became a series of vignettes exploring how average people react to finding themselves in a utopia.


This was Gaiman’s first comics work and so it’s surprising that it’s some of his best. The stories in this volume are both wildly imaginative and emotionally grounded. We’re introduced to various people — a father making a pilgrimage to Miracleman to ask him to save his daughter’s life, a spy learning to live in a world without espionage and even a resurrected Andy Warhol questioning existence and getting back into silk screening — each of them trying to understand what it means to be human in a world that is suddenly (more or less) perfect. Fans of Gaiman’s Sandman series will find plenty to enjoy, and even non comic book fans will discover a book that proves comics don’t have to be violent to explore adult ideas.


Miss Julia Inherits a Mess

posted by: May 24, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Miss Julia Inherits a MessEver the faithful friend and family fixer, Miss Julia is plunged into a disaster not of her own making in Miss Julia Inherits a Mess by Ann B. Ross. Julia is dismayed to learn that Mattie Freemantle, a spinster with no family, has fallen and broken her hip. As any good neighbors would, Julia and her friends gather to visit, comfort and organize. Mattie can hardly be called a close friend, but it’s the right thing to do. So you can just imagine Julia’s reaction when she receives a call from Mattie’s lawyer informing her she entrusted Julia with power of attorney, and that decisions must be made promptly. When Mattie dies, Julia learns to her horror that she is the executor of the will.


Mattie’s home is loaded with furniture, bric-a-brac and junk mail that will take weeks to sort. Mattie has remembered half the town in her will, from the mechanic who repaired her ancient car to the grocery boy who carried her parcels. Mattie’s promises went a lot farther than her wealth; that $840 in her bank account isn’t going to go far.


Realizing that the task will only fall to less capable shoulders, Julia pitches in and gets to work. Employing some local experts to assist with valuation, a possible nugget is discovered under all that dust. Things are looking up, until a young man claiming to be Mattie’s long lost nephew asks to live in her apartment and take some of her things — for sentimental value, of course.


Fans of lighthearted southern fiction will delight in the town’s eccentric characters and Miss Julia’s efforts to fulfill a lonely old spinster's final wishes. Fans of Fanny Flagg, Mignon Ballard and Jan Karon will find a treat in this satisfying romp.




Journey to Munich

posted by: May 23, 2016 - 7:00am

Journey to MunichIn early 1938, the intrepid Maisie Dobbs returns to England and her former profession in Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspear. As Maisie walks the streets of London, she meanders through her memories. Dealing with her grief and the irresponsible actions that lead to her husband’s death, Maisie is approached by MI-5 for a treacherous mission. Leon Donat, a British subject visiting Germany to publish books, has been taken prisoner and sent to the notorious prison at Dachau. After complex negotiations, the German government has agreed to release Donat, but only if his daughter personally escorts her father home. Bearing a striking resemblance to Donat’s gravely ill daughter, as well as possessing certain valuable skills, MI-5 considers Maisie to be Donat’s only chance at escape.


Donat is no ordinary book publisher. He loves to tinker, and with his pen and paper he creates amazing inventions. Donat’s engineering skills and creative energy could mean the difference between winning and losing a war. While war has not yet been declared, it is obvious that the great nations of Europe are marching down an inexorable path. Germany has become a powder keg of simmering tensions, traitorous neighbors and underground defiance. Into this maelstrom, Maisie must convince Nazi officials she is Donat’s daughter and spirit him safely away before the Gestapo discovers his value.


Winspear has created a tale of emotional depth and moral conflict as Maisie struggles to reconcile her own experiences with what she has been called upon to perform. For while she is trying to free Donat, she has also been asked to assist the one person she holds accountable for her husband’s death.


Jacqueline Winspear has won the Agatha, Alex and Macavity awards for best first novel. If you like your mysteries with lots of historical atmosphere, a touch of spiritualism and a lot of spunk, Journey to Munich will surely deliver.




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