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By the Seashore

By the Seashore

posted by:
July 18, 2014 - 7:00am

The Girls of AugustNantucket SistersTwo novels highlight the beauty of the beach and celebrate the power of female friendship.  Enjoy perfect summer escapes with Anne Rivers Siddons’ The Girls of August and Nantucket Sisters by Nancy Thayer.

 

Siddons introduces readers to Maddy, Rachel, Barbara and Melinda when they are in their 20s, newly married and seeing their husbands through medical school. As the four become fast friends, they make a pact to spend one week together in August at a beach house. Though their lives change, the women keep this promise and travel to different beach houses over the years to reconnect. That is, until Melinda dies in a car accident and the August ritual is abandoned. Years later, Melinda’s husband remarries Baby, a 20-something who tries to resurrect the annual trip. The four end up at Baby’s remote family home on a barrier island off the South Carolina coast where jealousy simmers, secrets are revealed and friendship is tested. Siddons once again delivers an emotionally satisfying Southern summer tale with well-drawn women dealing with real, explosive issues.

 

Looking for a different beach? Travel north with Nancy Thayer to beautiful Nantucket. This lush setting is where Maggie and Emily meet as children and develop an unlikely, but strong, summer friendship. Emily is from a moneyed family whose mother wants nothing to do with the islanders. Maggie is the daughter of a local seamstress struggling to make ends meet. As the two get older, real life gets in the way and the girls drift apart. Emily wants more from life than simply being the wife of a successful husband while Maggie works hard, saves her money and longs for a passionate romance. It seems unlikely their paths will cross again until one wealthy Wall Street broker begins wooing both women. This engaging novel has romance and drama, but its centerpiece is the beauty and strength of lasting friendship.

Maureen

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Jeremy P. Bushnell’s The Weirdness

The WeirdnessTeacher, blog and forum editor, roleplaying game designer and writer Jeremy P. Bushnell’s debut novel The Weirdness is the perfect amalgamation of his mediums of creativity. Only someone who has spent their life marinating in nerd culture would be able to devise a plot and cast as imaginative and unique as Bushnell has in The Weirdness.

 

Billy Ridgeway is growing too complacent with his life; all he has to show for himself as a self-proclaimed “writer” is a couple of short stories and a novel vomited forth at the tail end of a post-college-dropout bender of forced artistry. While his former peers are paying mortgages and spawning children, he’s stalled making sandwiches for eight hours a day at a Greek deli.

 

Of course, this all changes one morning when Billy awakens to a suave-looking dude he doesn’t know sitting on his couch. Introducing himself as “Lucifer Morningstar,” the dude offers Billy some coffee, and with it an only slightly nefarious proposal that would launch his writing career. In a rare bout of good judgment, Billy declines and tries to go about his day; unfortunately for him, Lucifer is a supernaturally persistent guy, and he’s about to make things weird—like, warlocks and sex-wolves and plots to take over the world weird.

 

Bushnell’s novel is a swirl of contemporary geek humor and sci-fi, blended with a unique, refreshing writing style. He uses unconventional means—absurd similes, unexpected question marks, hypothetical maybes—to create an amusing feeling of doubt and disbelief in his narrative voice, which allows his characters to act with as much hyperbole as the reader wants to perceive. The Weirdness has to be read to be believed, and should not be missed by anyone who enjoys contemporary, surreal fiction.

Tom

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From Novel to TV

Fresh Off the BoatComing soon to the ABC network is a memoir turned television series, Fresh Off the Boat by Eddie Huang. In his memoir, Huang describes how his immigrant family moves from D.C. to Florida so that his father can open his own restaurant. Huang goes on to describe what life was like growing up as a Taiwanese-Chinese-American, not just in the United States, but also in a community with little diversity.

 

The audiobook for this memoir is narrated by Eddie Huang, which gives the reader a greater understanding of his perspective. His direct manner of detailing his eclectic array of experiences is uncensored and sincere. Culture is a prevalent theme throughout the book and food is frequently a platform for Huang to discuss the topic.

 

After listening to the audiobook, I will be interested to see how Huang’s book translates into an ABC series that appears to be quite comical. While the book isn’t without humor, it seems to focus more on challenging what are considered to be cultural norms and showing the impact that assimilation can have on a boy and his family as a whole. If you find yourself a fan of Huang’s style, checkout his video series on vice.com.

Randalee

 
 

Not Your Kids’ Harry Potter

The SilkwormBy now, the secret is out: J.K. Rowling, of Harry Potter fame, has a new mystery series for adults written under the nom de plume Robert Galbraith. Last year saw the publication of The Cuckoo’s Calling, the first book featuring British private detective Cormoran Strike, and it made a splash when it was “leaked” that Galbraith was actually Rowling. Just released is the second Galbraith book, The Silkworm.

 

Cormoran Strike is an unusual man. The illegitimate and estranged son of a rock star, a former military special investigations officer and missing a leg thanks to an encounter with an IED, The Silkworm opens with Strike’s star on the rise. After unraveling the suspicious circumstances surrounding a supermodel’s death in The Cuckoo’s Calling, the hoi polloi are flocking to Strike’s detective agency, which is finally turning a profit. Mousy and odd, his new client Leonora engages Strike to locate her husband, Owen Quine, a has-been author desperate for a bestseller. While Quine may be missing, his latest novel is not. Unauthorized copies of his Bombyx Mori are popping up all over London, and since the perverted story disgustingly skewers a number of barely disguised book world luminaries, Quine’s enemies are becoming legion. Strike and his secretary/assistant Robin pick up the case, finding themselves at odds with the local police.

 

Rowling’s writing style is straightforward as she moves these plot-driven whodunit stories along at a steady clip, and her characters are likeable and well-drawn. Readers will return to this entertaining series to find out if Strike maintains a clean break from a long-term but toxic relationship, or if Robin attains her goal to move beyond office secretary to become a detective herself in spite of her stuffed shirt fiancé’s objections.

Lori

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Love Letters Gone Awry

Love Letters Gone Awry

posted by:
July 16, 2014 - 7:00am

To All the Boys I've Loved BeforeJenny Han, author of the Summer series and coauthor of the Burn for Burn series, returns with the start of a new series, To All the Boys I've Loved Before. The main character, Lara Jean, and her sisters, Margot and Kitty, have always been incredibly close, taking care of one another since their mother passed away. The Song girls, as they call themselves to honor their mother's Korean heritage, run the household while their father, a doctor, is busy at work. As the novel begins, Lara Jean's happy, but sometimes boring life, gets turned upside down.

 

When Margot, the oldest of the Song girls heads off to college in Scotland, she breaks up with Josh, her boyfriend and the quintessential boy next door, who Lara Jean once secretly loved. Lara Jean wrote Josh a letter when he and Margot started dating so she could move on and stop loving him, a practice she's used with every boy she's loved before. She keeps the letters in a hat box, looking at them from time to time, but never sending them. One day, she finds the box and letters missing, and the boys she once loved start approaching her in school about the letters.

 

Lara Jean and Peter, one of the boys she loved in middle school, decide to pretend to date, so she can avoid awkwardness with Josh, and Peter can make his ex-girlfriend jealous. Readers will enjoy Lara Jean and Peter trying to keep up their dating charade, as she's forced to confront her feelings for all the boys and their feelings for her. To All the Boys I've Loved Before is a realistic, romantic teen book perfect for readers looking for a fun summer read! Be on the lookout for the sequel, P.S. I Still Love You.

Laura

 
 

A Wedding in Provence

A Wedding in Provence

posted by:
July 15, 2014 - 7:00am

A Wedding in ProvenceAh, summer. That time of year when the fridge is covered in cream-colored envelopes with fancy fonts. It’s wedding season, and if you’re spending all your time buying gifts from registries and listening to a bridal march for what feels like the 100th time this summer, why not take a break from all those taffeta bridesmaids dresses and have yourself a little vacation to southeastern France in Ellen Sussman’s new book A Wedding in Provence?

 

Olivia and Brody are excited to spend their wedding weekend at a charming B&B owned by their friends in Provence. In their 50s, they are optimistic at their second chance at a loving marriage. Their family and friends are in attendance, ready to celebrate with them. However, even in this idyllic setting, old family jealousies and new problems threaten to overturn the joy of their wedding weekend. Olivia’s daughters, Nell and Carly, are coming from two disastrously different romantic situations: Carly’s longtime boyfriend has decided to skip the wedding altogether, and Nell, mourning the loss of her dead boyfriend, picks up her seatmate on the plane to attend the wedding with her.

 

Carly and Nell are not the only ones with secrets to keep. Emily and Sebastien, the owners of the B&B, are weathering a difficult time in their marriage, Brody’s father has just left his mother after 55 years, and then there’s wild card best man Jake, who seems harmless, but has his own hidden agenda.

 

Fans of romances with an edge and of Sussman’s other novels, such as French Lessons or The Paradise Guest House, will find this novel a summer soap opera to read while waiting for the bridal party to have their photos taken and cocktail hour to begin.

Jessica

 
 

Finding Her Chinese Roots

Finding Her Chinese Roots

posted by:
July 15, 2014 - 7:00am

The Year of the Fortune CookieFor sixth grader Anna Wang, life is presenting her with some serious and exciting challenges. She’s learning her way around middle school, trying to make new friends and accepting her adopted baby sister Kaylee. In The Year of the Fortune Cookie by Andrea Cheng, Anna’s also been offered the chance of a lifetime. Her family’s friends, the Sylvesters, have invited Anna and her mom to travel to China. Being a Chinese-American and having a basic understanding of the language, Anna realizes that this trip is a way to connect with her Chinese relatives, see the orphanage where her sister used to live, and improve her language skills. Unfortunately, Anna’s mom cannot get time off from work to accompany her so she has to travel by herself.

 

This third installment in the Anna Wang series gives the young heroine some real-life issues to deal with in a thought-provoking way. While Anna has never even travelled out of state by herself before, the chance visit to China is one that she cannot turn down, even though it takes a lot of inner strength and courage for her to go. Cheng effectively portrays how Anna, being one of a small number of Asian-American students in her home town, is suddenly thrust into a culture where she no longer sees herself as a minority. Yet, while the Chinese people do not stare at Anna as an outsider, she comes to realize that she is not just Chinese or just American but both. Cheng also nicely integrates some simple Chinese words and symbols throughout the story so young readers can learn something about the language.

Regina

 
 

Between the Covers with the Beekman Boys

Cover art for Heirloom Vegetable CookbookThe local farmer’s market has come alive with the colors and flavors of seasonal vegetables, so now is a great time to dive into The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook and add more greens to your table.
 

Fans will remember Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell as the two NYC executives who gave up their jobs, purchased a goat farm in Sharon Springs, New York, and became successful reality TV celebrities on The Fabulous Beekman Boys and The Amazing Race. The cookbooks are certainly popular. Food & Wine magazine rated the The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook as one of the best of 2013. Brent and Josh include personal anecdotes in the introduction to many of the recipes and have added beautiful color photographs of many of the dishes and photographs of life on the Beekman farm. Recipes have a classic feel, feature easy-to-find ingredients and are simple enough for cooks with little kitchen experience. Imagine the delight when you show up at the next company picnic with a chocolate beet cake or a multi-hued tomato tart!
 

Between the Covers posed some questions to Brent and Josh about the cookbook:
 

Between the Covers: The cookbook is divided into four “seasons” of recipes. Which season inspires you the most to make creative dishes?

Brent and Josh: Our entire company is based around seasonal living, so we draw inspiration from and try to make the most of what each season offers. It's not fair to choose favorites.
 

BTC: In the introduction, you encourage the reader to use the cookbook as an heirloom that could inspire future generations of cooks. What is an heirloom recipe?

B&J: An heirloom recipe is one that is made so frequently in your family that it has its own folklore and mythology built around it. In order to become an heirloom, we think a recipe has to be delicious, easy to make and include readily available ingredients. These are the types of foods that we find comfort in.
 

BTC: Can you tell us about any family member that inspired you to work with food?

B&J: Brent takes a lot of inspiration from his grandmother and great-grandmother who managed to put delicious meals on the table even in the hard-environs of the West Virginia coal mining communities. Josh's uncle, an ex-pat living in the south of France, taught him that technique is secondary to having the best, freshest ingredients.
 

BTC: Can you tell us a bit about the test process that takes you from an idea to a finished, polished recipe?

B&J: We cook dinner every single night that we are at the farm. Most of the recipes for all of our books have their origins in these meals. We harvest what is ready to be harvested and then ask ourselves, "What can we do with this?"
 

BTC: How do you divide your kitchen duties?

B&J: Brent is the creative thinker. Josh is the master of execution.
 

BTC: Do you have any words of encouragement for kitchen novices who really want to start eating fresher at home?

B&J: Think of your trip to the market as a grand adventure. Choose one new fresh ingredient each week and learn how to make it shine in something you cook.
 

If you would like to meet Brent and Josh, they will be appearing at the Baltimore Book Festival on Saturday, September 27 at 5 p.m.
 

For more information about the Beekman boys, read The Bucolic Plague: How Two Manhattanites Became Gentleman Farmers by Josh Kilmer-Purcell.

Doug

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Relationship Status: Single

Relationship Status: Single

posted by:
July 14, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for On the RocksOn the Rocks by Erin Duffy opens with Abby trying on the Vera Wang wedding dress of her dreams. At that moment, her fiancé Ben changes his Facebook relationship status to single and Abby’s life is shattered in this charming novel of friendship, family and love in the crazy age of social media.

 

As Abby struggles to get over Ben, her best friend Grace decides they both need a change of scenery and rents a quaint cottage in Newport for the two to share over the summer. While the pair leaves their problems behind, they enjoy sea breezes, refreshing cocktails and the attentions of handsome men. Abby also secures her very own dating coach when she meets Bobby, an awkward, out-of-work lawyer who demands that she focus on dating as if it were a job. But dating has changed in the 12 years Abby was with Ben, and social media has put a scary spin on the social scene. From Facebook to a walk-of-shame website, Abby navigates her new role as a singleton without the privilege of privacy and the possibility of being cast as a viral victim just a click away.

 

Duffy’s fresh story is a humorous but realistic foray into contemporary dating. Bad dates, laughable pick-up lines, crazy families and clever dialogue are peppered throughout this fun and relatable story that's ultimately the tale of one woman’s unpredictable journey to happiness. Fans of Elin Hilderbrand, Sarah Pekkanen and Nancy Thayer should definitely pack this one on vacation!

Maureen

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To Be Young and a Liar

To Be Young and a Liar

posted by:
July 11, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for We Were Liars"My full name is Cadence Sinclair Eastman. I live in Burlington, Vermont, with Mummy and three dogs. I am nearly eighteen. I suffer migraines. I do not suffer fools."

 

So begins and ends E. Lockhart’s new book We Were Liars. Yet, by the end, the reader will have a much clearer perspective on the narrator's words. Cadence is part of the powerful and distinguished Sinclair family of New England. Every summer, the extended families vacation on their private island, each family set up in their own beautiful house. Idyllic? There’s been an unchallenged stoicism to the Sinclair family, but modernism with its myriad of issues is breaking to the surface: divorce, debt, addiction, the welcoming of outsiders — and the family hasn’t handled it well.

 

Then there’s Cadence herself. Every summer, she has been with her two cousins – Mirren and Johnny, later joined by Gat, the nephew of one of her aunt’s new husbands. They became known as “The Liars” for the trouble they caused as a group. But something happens on the island at the end of Cadence’s 15th summer, something of which she has no recollection, except that she almost drowned. Plagued by health issues, she doesn’t return until her 17th summer. She tried to reach out to her cousins and friend during her absence but heard nothing. No one else will talk about what happened that year, or what led up to her near death. Everyone tells her she must remember herself. Slowly, she recovers memories of her life that summer and puts pieces together to reveal a much darker family history. By the end, she will be face-to-face with grief and the full horror of events.

 

Told with beautiful poetic lyricism and sparse wording conveying rich description, this book shouldn’t be overlooked by adults or book clubs. Rife with character introspection, family dysfunction and mystery layered with fractured reality, in its final pages, We Were Liars packs a powerful punch. 

Melanie